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Friday 27 November 2015 | Dr Paul Hine
2015 Nearing Completion
After the ardours, the rewards, the low points and the highlights of the last four weeks, the Year 9 Challenge comes to completion today. That it has had its ‘challenges’ is abundantly clear, from drenching rain in the early weeks to the highest November temperature in a decade in the latter stages (which among other things, forced the evacuation of the Mentors program!!), with all of the corollaries in between. But, it is over and the boys remain the beneficiaries of the experience, largely through the development of pietas – that forging of character that will enable these young men to see the difficulties and the diversity of their world and respond accordingly. At the middle stages of adolescence, they still have much to forge, but, the imprint of this experience is strong and will remain part of their reflection over the weeks ahead, and, decisive in their formation as they progress into the middle and senior secondary years. Special thanks are extended to the coordinator of the program, Mr Adrian Byrne, to the teachers, parents and the supporters who assisted (at times cajoled!!) the boys across the line, and of course to the boys who participated with open hearts and open minds; the comrades in arms who helped each other across some of the most difficult sections of the program.
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Friday 29 May 2015 | Dr Paul Hine
A Moving Statement
Symbolism, gravity, respect and sincerity were salient features of the Indigenous Reconciliation Assembly that was held in the Gartlan Centre on Tuesday 26 May, the day that has been reserved for the national commemoration of Sorry Day. The richness of culture and a prevailing spirituality footnoted the ceremony with a fusion of traditional and contemporary dance and music. This was complemented by a compelling rendition of the stolen generation, captured with dramatic emotion and intuitive depth by Joseph Althouse. A personal statement by Ali Crawshaw-Tomlins profiled the life of his grandmother – Nanna Daisy Ruddick, who former Prime Minister Gough Whitlam described as ‘Australia’s royalty’; a life that was debased by the historical circumstances of her contemporary world but one that was a triumph of resilience and integrity. More than a school assembly, this was a statement of regret and lament for the grave mistakes of the past and the need for a fully reconciled Australia into the future.
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